QLD - Flanagans Reserve, Rathdowney

Postby Troyk » Mon Jan 07, 2008 11:04 pm

Scotty, We prefer to leave them at home and get a friend/neighbour to come and feed them each day, as opposed to the pet motel. They don't get stressed as much in familiar territory. Plus it means someone is keeping an eye on your house.

Mind you the cat has been known to open the pantry door and helping himself.

One problem with the Pet Motels is that during busy periods they require a minimum 2 week booking, hey just like some caravan parks.
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Postby ScottyB » Tue Jan 08, 2008 6:38 pm

gypsylady wrote:I have made a personal list which is currently about 6 pages in total and I carry copies of this with me and hand them out when someone expresses an interest in pet friendly camp grounds.


Now that is exactly why I was drawn to this forum and a return to camping - you get to meet some really genuine people that are actually looking out for other people. Good on you.

I spend a fair bit of time working on our western highways and am constantly amazed at how many people drive past stranded motorists with young families etc and nobody checks to see if they are okay. If only there were more considerate people like yourself around.....
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Postby ScottyB » Tue Jan 08, 2008 6:40 pm

Troyk wrote:Scotty, We prefer to leave them at home and get a friend/neighbour to come and feed them each day, as opposed to the pet motel. They don't get stressed as much in familiar territory. Plus it means someone is keeping an eye on your house.


Yes we have done that before too. Our little fella seems to really like the Pet Motel though, he gets the royal treatment there I think. I would prefer to take him along whenever I can, problem is being a Jack Russell he likes to run away on you a bit when he sees an opening....
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Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:38 am

ScottyB wrote:
gypsylady wrote:I have made a personal list which is currently about 6 pages in total and I carry copies of this with me and hand them out when someone expresses an interest in pet friendly camp grounds.


Now that is exactly why I was drawn to this forum and a return to camping - you get to meet some really genuine people that are actually looking out for other people. Good on you.

I spend a fair bit of time working on our western highways and am constantly amazed at how many people drive past stranded motorists with young families etc and nobody checks to see if they are okay. If only there were more considerate people like yourself around.....


Thank you Scott for your kind words.
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Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:46 am

ScottyB wrote:
Troyk wrote:Scotty, We prefer to leave them at home and get a friend/neighbour to come and feed them each day, as opposed to the pet motel. They don't get stressed as much in familiar territory. Plus it means someone is keeping an eye on your house.


Yes we have done that before too. Our little fella seems to really like the Pet Motel though, he gets the royal treatment there I think. I would prefer to take him along whenever I can, problem is being a Jack Russell he likes to run away on you a bit when he sees an opening....


How does he take to a lead Scott, a long lead and how old is he??

I used to always do the 'right' thing and tie my girl up but at 11 months she was attacked by a staffy who was not tied up, it is now not possible.

The staffy took a piece out of her side and as you can imagine the rest is history. If restraining her is the only option I know run a fence around the camp and even though she can go over it or under she never tries, she understands it to to be the boundary.

Mind you she has been camping with me since she was 10 weeks old when I used to take a kiddy playpen for the outside and a porta cot for the inside.

BTW she is better behaved than a lot of kids we see.

Cheers....
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Postby ScottyB » Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:17 pm

gypsylady wrote:How does he take to a lead Scott, a long lead and how old is he??


Jack is 2 years old. Santa delivered him to us at Xmas 2005. Santa went to an extraordinary amount of trouble to do this, hence the reason Jack is so well appreciated by the family. He has literally grown up with our youngest daughter and they are inseperable.

He is no problems on the lead, although I suspect most smaller breeds generally are, unless there is something around at night that he perceives as a threat to the family then he gets barky. He is not a biter like some smaller breeds can be when threatened, but instinctively he tries to follow a trail hence his propensity to take off.

On our few camping trips so far I have run a long line of rope up high, and then attached a light chain off that rope to give him a fair run and minimise him getting tangled. I truly believe he is happy on that run so long as he isnt missing out on being close to us, although ideally if I would prefer he would not do a runner off the lead. I think the breed is known for being more "smartass" than "smart" and try to get one up on you to take off. With the bigger tent now we will bring him in at night with his bed in the corner, he always stops the barking when he knows we are okay.

I guess with the variety of nocturnal wildlife most dogs in a pet friendly campground will make their presence known. Whilst I dont mind him having a bit of a bark, I try to minimise his barking for the sake of the neighbours / fellow campers out of consideration for them.
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Postby Poodle Jewel » Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:43 pm

My two are such mummy`s sooks they quite like being on a lead near me,provided they get a walk or run to off load some energy.Fergie hasn`t been camping before,at home she tends to yap at any noise outside day or night so i am looking at bark collars,the last thing i want to do is P... off the other campers.Charlie on the other hand will suck up to anybody for a pat. As posted in another post i have some Camping with dogs books.
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Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:18 pm

ScottyB wrote:
gypsylady wrote:How does he take to a lead Scott, a long lead and how old is he??


Jack is 2 years old. Santa delivered him to us at Xmas 2005. Santa went to an extraordinary amount of trouble to do this, hence the reason Jack is so well appreciated by the family. He has literally grown up with our youngest daughter and they are inseperable.

He is no problems on the lead, although I suspect most smaller breeds generally are, unless there is something around at night that he perceives as a threat to the family then he gets barky. He is not a biter like some smaller breeds can be when threatened, but instinctively he tries to follow a trail hence his propensity to take off.

On our few camping trips so far I have run a long line of rope up high, and then attached a light chain off that rope to give him a fair run and minimise him getting tangled. I truly believe he is happy on that run so long as he isnt missing out on being close to us, although ideally if I would prefer he would not do a runner off the lead. I think the breed is known for being more "smartass" than "smart" and try to get one up on you to take off. With the bigger tent now we will bring him in at night with his bed in the corner, he always stops the barking when he knows we are okay.

I guess with the variety of nocturnal wildlife most dogs in a pet friendly campground will make their presence known. Whilst I dont mind him having a bit of a bark, I try to minimise his barking for the sake of the neighbours / fellow campers out of consideration for them.


Well Scott it seems you have it all sorted and it is good that he will tie up well.

In my personal experience most of the nocturnal wildlife head for the hills when the campers move in so they don't present much issue at all.

Having him inside with you will obviously decrease his need to 'protect' you and hence reduce his barking, hopefully.

Barking is one thing I have never had any probs with as such. My girl tends to huff and puff and has the odd growl when there is another dog about but that is about her limit. The minute she oversteps the mark though she is sent to 'bed' as punishment.

I find most dogs who are treated a members of the family behave pretty well.
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Postby ScottyB » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:33 pm

Poodle Jewel wrote:Fergie hasn`t been camping before,at home she tends to yap at any noise outside day or night so i am looking at bark collars,the last thing i want to do is P... off the other campers.


We looked at various expensive bark collars whilst trying to settle our boy down. We raised it with a vet for advice on which were good and which to avoid. To say the vet was against it was is an understatement. They have seen some horrific injuries to dogs from them, which put us off the idea altogether.

Their best advice was to simply get our lazy butts out of bed and calm our dog down and reassure him all was okay. Being a father of young girls, and a shift worker, getting up through the night to reassure the boy wasnt such an imposition on me. It has not solved the problem, but that small inconvenience certainly improved it considerably.

I am with you, I dont want to ruin the experience of other campers, but after the stories of the vets we have binned the collar idea.

You are right Gypsylady, dogs treated as members of the family are well behaved. Unfortunately my household is all girls, who love to have the final say in everything. I think the dog has inherited this from them.......
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Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:51 pm

ScottyB wrote:
Poodle Jewel wrote:Fergie hasn`t been camping before,at home she tends to yap at any noise outside day or night so i am looking at bark collars,the last thing i want to do is P... off the other campers.


We looked at various expensive bark collars whilst trying to settle our boy down. We raised it with a vet for advice on which were good and which to avoid. To say the vet was against it was is an understatement. They have seen some horrific injuries to dogs from them, which put us off the idea altogether.

Their best advice was to simply get our lazy butts out of bed and calm our dog down and reassure him all was okay. Being a father of young girls, and a shift worker, getting up through the night to reassure the boy wasnt such an imposition on me. It has not solved the problem, but that small inconvenience certainly improved it considerably.

I am with you, I dont want to ruin the experience of other campers, but after the stories of the vets we have binned the collar idea.

You are right Gypsylady, dogs treated as members of the family are well behaved. Unfortunately my household is all girls, who love to have the final say in everything. I think the dog has inherited this from them.......


Ha, ha perhaps a desentising programme is the way to go for Jack, it might even work on the girls too. (lol) It is often long term project but the success rate is very high.

Re the collars and not knowing which one/s your vet commented on I can't say but I do wonder how appropriately they might have been used. They should only be used in the short term and I do mean the really short term so as not to do any damage.

I am sure they are often put on the dog and then just forgotten. That is not how they are meant to be used.
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Postby ScottyB » Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:06 pm

gypsylady wrote:Re the collars and not knowing which one/s your vet commented on I can't say but I do wonder how appropriately they might have been used. They should only be used in the short term and I do mean the really short term so as not to do any damage.


I think the problem is that people go for the dog collars as the last resort, especially given the ones we looked at were $400 plus and "won't hurt the dog". I guess when you are outlaying that sort of coin for a collar you are getting desperate and want it to work however long it takes.

The vet was against all of them, although I dont doubt that there will be brands out there that have the vet "tick of approval" on the label. We only went to the one vet, but the resistance of that vet was staunch so I would assume most vets are "cautious" of them. Our vet has treated dogs where some collars have literally burned a hole through the dogs neck almost overnight.

There may well be much safer products on the market, but considering we were prepared to buy the best one available, I would have thought it was 100% safe for the dog and the vet could recommened just one. It reminded me of a Rottweiler we had years ago, she was an abused dog we got from the RSPCA, and every time we walked her she would pull really hard on the lead to the point I bought a choker collar to try and pull her up. It only seemed to make her pull harder to the point of gagging so I threw it away. I suspect bark collars might work the same way on some dogs in that they see it as some sort of challenge or game.
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Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:36 pm

ScottyB wrote:
I think the problem is that people go for the dog collars as the last resort, especially given the ones we looked at were $400 plus and "won't hurt the dog". I guess when you are outlaying that sort of coin for a collar you are getting desperate and want it to work however long it takes.

The vet was against all of them, although I dont doubt that there will be brands out there that have the vet "tick of approval" on the label. We only went to the one vet, but the resistance of that vet was staunch so I would assume most vets are "cautious" of them. Our vet has treated dogs where some collars have literally burned a hole through the dogs neck almost overnight.

There may well be much safer products on the market, but considering we were prepared to buy the best one available, I would have thought it was 100% safe for the dog and the vet could recommened just one. It reminded me of a Rottweiler we had years ago, she was an abused dog we got from the RSPCA, and every time we walked her she would pull really hard on the lead to the point I bought a choker collar to try and pull her up. It only seemed to make her pull harder to the point of gagging so I threw it away. I suspect bark collars might work the same way on some dogs in that they see it as some sort of challenge or game.


It is not the collar that is the issue Scott, it is the user just the same as it is not the gun that is the problem it is the person at the end of it.

Choker chains are brilliant but you MUST know how to use them appropriately. They work on a reprimand/praise principal and this is very effective with strong larger type dogs but again they are either useless or dangerous if not used correctly.

The anti bark collar should not be put on the dog and just left on, it should only be used for the time the dog barks and then immediately removed the minute the stog stops which should only be a couple of minutes, if that long. It is then put back on the dog when he barks again and again removed the minute the dogs stops.

It was NEVER designed for the purpose of putting on the dog long term, that is when the damage is done and it becomes cruel.

SORRY I will get off my soap box but I did obedience for 17 years and judged for 4 years and saw a number of good things achieved when people did the right things with these very useful tools. I also saw some terrible things and saw many people dragging their dogs around a ring strangling them with choker chains and again this is not how they were meant to be used.

Cheers...
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Postby Cruzin » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:06 pm

Hi GL

re Barker Collars - many different types

I looked into this sometime ago with a view of stopping my Jack Russell "Jack" and bitza white Dingo "Ziggy" from barking when camping.
We have the "fence" around the camp site and we have the internal collapsible kiddies pen.

We were never, ever going to purcahse the "zapper" collar and ended up purchasing 2x sound actived "noise" collars ie when they barked a noise eminated form the the device and "surprised" them into not barking...... "not"

Zigpig is usually sent-off at camp only after Jack goes off at the slightest sound.
Jack use to "run for the hills" at being surprised by the noise..

So what is the best way to stop 'em from barking un-necessarilary?
I still want them to bark for awarness etc but not at every little "nothing".

Zig has a separate problem at home of being very ferocious when anbody turns up but then licks 'em to death, jumps up, pees and generally annoys them to throw the ball all the time they are at our house.

She fetches and drops and fetches approx 60 times before she gets tired.

Any advice??

Scott
I know what you mean about the "nose down" run-away style of the Russells. They are hard to catch-up with when they're on the scent.

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Postby ScottyB » Thu Jan 10, 2008 1:30 am

gypsylady wrote:It is not the collar that is the issue Scott, it is the user just the same as it is not the gun that is the problem it is the person at the end of it.

Choker chains are brilliant but you MUST know how to use them appropriately. They work on a reprimand/praise principal and this is very effective with strong larger type dogs but again they are either useless or dangerous if not used correctly.


I found chokers great with all our larger dogs from staffy right up to a great dane/ridgeback cross over the years with very minimal application, it was just the Rotty that didnt respond with them at all. She was one that had been beaten up in her early years and one of those dogs that people leave tied up to a post in the backyard all day and night ( a real welfare rescue job ), which is why I thought she just hated being on the lead at all.

As for the bark collars I just wrote them off after the response from the vet. We took the vets advice on reassurance and sometimes reprimand and that having him chopped (it still sends a chill up the spine) would help his behaviour. I gave him a few nights in our large garage area as well for a bit of comfort and less "stimulation" and that worked well with big improvements now he is out on "parole". At the end of the day dogs will bark, its what they do, and he is getting much better.
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Postby ScottyB » Thu Jan 10, 2008 1:34 am

Cruzin wrote:Scott
I know what you mean about the "nose down" run-away style of the Russells. They are hard to catch-up with when they're on the scent.


Apparently they are well known for it the cheeky buggers......
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