UHF CB BAND CHANGE

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UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby cokebottle » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:06 am

If you are thinking of buying some UHF CB's for your vehicle or handhelds for bush walking/camping etc in the near future, then give it some serious thought as to what you are going to buy, this is due to the ACMA (Australian Communications Management Authority) making changes in the 400-500Mhz band.

So if you can put off a purchase of radio equipment for about 18mths, which will give the manufacturers time to catch up & produce new radios to suit the new band plan.

What will happen is when the new allocated frequencies start getting populated the users on the older "wideband" radios on 25Khz spacing may get interference from the "narrowband" users on adjacent frequencies.


http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_312108.


The way ahead - Decisions and implementation options for the 400 MHz band

Section 5.

5 UHF Citizen Band Radio Service
The UHF Citizen Band Radio Service (CBRS) currently comprises 40 25 KHz channels from 476.4125–477.4125 MHz. Use of the CBRS is supported by a class licence. The band is highly utilised, which demonstrates that the existing regulatory approach is effective.

In reviewing the UHF CBRS, the ACMA’s objective is to improve the utility of the band through reviewing and updating current arrangements (such as channel bandwidths). Balancing future flexibility with the impact on existing users (in light of the extensive user base) is a particularly crucial consideration in this situation.

5.1 Background
In the Options Paper, the ACMA introduced the concept of increasing the number of UHF CBRS channels from 40 to 80 by the implementation of 12.5 kHz channelization, with a corresponding phase-out of 25 kHz channel equipment. Responses to the Options Paper showed that this concept was worth pursuing in more detail.

5.2 Original ACMA proposal
In the Proposals Paper, the ACMA proposed to undertake a process to implement revised arrangements for the UHF CBRS based on the following core concepts:
> extension of the CBRS band by 6.25 kHz at the top edge of the band
> the reduction to 12.5 kHz channels for CBRS simplex channels
> the retention of 25 kHz channels for the eight existing repeater channel pairs, including the emergency channels and the two (2) existing telemetry/telecommand channels
> review of the coordination and assignment rules for repeater channels.

5.3 Stakeholder feedback
Proposals for changes to the UHF CBRS received broad support from respondents to the Proposals Paper. Respondents stated that the proposed solution was a sound technical compromise, and that maintaining the existing 25 kHz channels for the eight existing repeater channel pairs, including the emergency channels and the two existing telemetry/telecommand channels, would decrease costs to users, and decrease interference during the phase-in period. Users of emergency channels also supported maintaining the emergency channel number allocations.

There was also a degree of support for the repeater channels to be reduced to 12.5 kHz, with additional repeater channels interleaved. This would provide additional capacity and therefore be beneficial in the long term. Some respondents proposed that this could be done as a second stage to the changes proposed by the ACMA, following sufficient time for the migration of equipment to 12.5 kHz channel bandwidth.

There was general support for a review of coordination and assignment rules for repeater channels. However, some respondents were concerned that this would increase interference.

5.4 The ACMA’s response to feedback
The ACMA’s broad objective of increasing the utility of this spectrum is consistent with stakeholder feedback and suggestions. Given stakeholder support, a phased approach to implementing additional 12.5 kHz repeater channels seems feasible, and provides maximum utility for the future.

5.5 Final decision
The final ACMA decision on the UHF Citizen band is as follows:
> the UHF Citizen band shall be extended upwards by 6.25 kHz to accommodate an additional 12.5 kHz channel
> all simplex voice channels shall transition to 12.5 kHz bandwidth
> existing repeater channels will transition to 12.5 kHz bandwidth, with new repeater channels created in the interleaved space
> the two telemetry/telecommand channels remain as is
> the licensing rules regarding repeaters have been relaxed.
Channel arrangements are detailed in Attachment 6.

5.6 Proposed transition arrangements
Before the new arrangements can be used, three key events must occur:
1/ new licensing arrangements must be put in place
2/ UHF CB equipment standards must be published and referenced in law
3/ manufacturers must make equipment available.

The ACMA has carriage of licensing arrangements and can implement changes in about six months. The ACMA participates in equipment standards formation, along with equipment manufacturers and other experts, and the process of modifying the existing standard may take around 12 months. It is therefore the ACMA’s intention to have the framework in place supporting the use of the new arrangements in the second quarter of 2011, and equipment manufacturers may work in parallel with standards development to have the new equipment available when they can.

From 1 January 2011, the additional simplex and telemetry/telecommand channels will become available, and after five years, the use of 25 kHz equipment will not be supported.

By 1 January 2016, repeaters will have completed transition to 12.5 kHz bandwidth and the additional interleaved repeater channels will become available for use.

UHF CB Service Channel Plan

Frequency * New Ch * New Step
Ch1A 476.4250 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch1B 476.4375 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch2A 476.4500 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch2B 476.4625 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch3A 476.4750 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch3B 476.4875 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch4A 476.5000 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch4B 476.5125 12.5 kHz Repeater
CH5A 476.5250 12.5 kHz Emergency
Ch5B 476.5375 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch6A 476.5500 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch6B 476.5625 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch7A 476.5750 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch7B 476.5875 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch8A 476.6000 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch8B 476.6125 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch9A 476.6250 12.5 kHz Old simplex Now 12.5 kHz
Ch9B 476.6375 12.5 kHz New simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch10A 476.6500 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch10B 476.6625 12.5 kHz New simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch11A 476.6750 12.5 kHz Calling now 12 .5 kHz
Ch11B 476.6875 12.5 kHz New simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch12A 476.7000 12.5 kHz Old simplex Now 12.5 kHz
Ch12B 476.7125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch13A 476.7250 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch13B 476.7375 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch14A 476.7500 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch14B 476.7625 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch15A 476.7750 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch15B 476.7875 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch16A 476.8000 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch16B 476.8125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch17A 476.8250 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch17B 476.8375 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch18A 476.8500 12.5 kHz Old simplex 1now 2.5 kHz
Ch18B 476.8625 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch19A 476.8750 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch19B 476.8875 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch20A 476.9000 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch20B 476.9125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch21A 476.9250 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch22 476.9500 25 kHz Tele-command no change
Ch23 476.9750 25 kHz Tele-command no change
Ch24A 477.0000 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch24B 477.0125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch25A 477.0250 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch25B 477.0375 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch26A 477.0500 12.5 kHz Simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch26B 477.0625 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch27A 477.0750 12.5 kHz Simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch27B 477.0875 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch28A 477.1000 12.5 kHz Simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch28B 477.1125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch29A 477.1250 12.5 kHz Simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch29B 477.1375 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch30 477.1500 12.5 kHz Simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch31A 477.1750 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch31B 477.1875 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch32A 477.2000 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch32B 477.2125 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch33A 477.2250 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch33B 477.2375 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch34A 477.2500 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch34B 477.2625 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch35A 477.2750 12.5 kHz Emergency
Ch35B 477.2875 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch36A 477.3000 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch36B 477.3125 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch37A 477.3250 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch37B 477.3375 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch38A 477.3500 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch38B 477.3625 12.5 kHz Repeater
Ch39A 477.3750 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch39B 477.3875 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz
Ch40A 477.4000 12.5 kHz Old simplex now 12.5 kHz
Ch40B 477.4125 12.5 kHz New Simplex 12.5 kHz


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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:32 am

That IS interesting, thanks Michael.
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby cokebottle » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:38 am

I am predicting that once the word gets out there will be a flood of cheap older radios on eBay etc, which unsuspecting buyers may get & give interferance to the narrowband users....

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby GypsyLady » Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:58 pm

I am not happy with the one I have so it will give me a great excuse to repace it in time to come....yippee.
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby HGMonaro » Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:37 am

very happy with the one I have, so will not be impressed if I have to buy a new one :(

hopefully the kids handhelds keep working too.
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby cokebottle » Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:51 am

HGMonaro wrote:very happy with the one I have, so will not be impressed if I have to buy a new one :(

hopefully the kids handhelds keep working too.


The older ones will still work, just may get & give interference from the new users from adjacent channels, you could compare it to a local council suddenly saying that every house had to be split into two to accommodate two families.

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby Rosco532 » Fri Jun 18, 2010 8:08 pm

I'd like to see them go one further....and have to have each set ''Registered''.....
They need to try and get the Mongrels who use the foul language off the air....
Avis often comments how unpleasant some peoples bad language can be over the air.....I think they must forget that Ladies are often on board....or worse still ''Children''....

I use ours every day while travelling on the Motorway.....

(End of Grump.)

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby GypsyLady » Fri Jun 18, 2010 9:16 pm

We used to have registration as in licencing in days of old Rosco and even had RIs (Radio Inspectors) but it never made any difference to the bad behaviour on the air ways.

Like everything else there were always the 'pirates' who ran illegally and abused the system especially with their foul language and bad behaviour.

We started with single registration and went at one time to up to 5 sets on the one licence and I must admit it did surprise me when the licencing was dropped.

Bit like the wireless (radio) and TV licences we used to have.
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby stevo. » Sat Jun 19, 2010 8:10 am

Yeah i remember paying the $10 or what ever it was for a 27Mhz radio licence, but as stated no one used their callsigns anyway and there was still poor behaviour.

You could get in to Amateur Radio, the radios are more expensive but you have to have a licence/callsign, and anounce it when using the radio, and there's no foul language and everyone is very nice. You can use repeaters and talk anywhere around australia or the world, or if you use HF you can do the same without repeaters. But you wont get the traffic reports as you might using channel 40 UHF477

I think it will be a while before eveyone has a 80channel uhf radio.
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby Jo&Kev » Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:38 pm

Michael

Any idea what bought this on?

I scan across about a dozen commonly used channels on my drive to/from work - Yass to Canberra - and mostly there is not a great deal being said on most... Less regularly I travel up the Hume to Sydney, same deal, and recently we did a fairly big loop (from Yass to Cameron Corner to the coast and then home) of 4400km or so, again - infrequent use. Once in Sydney I turned the set off because I found it annoying and offensive. (I find cities like that anyway...)

I'm hoping that it isn't a case of there is channel congestion in the cities so we need to change kit across the country.

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby HGMonaro » Tue Jun 22, 2010 10:03 am

Jo&Kev wrote:Michael

Any idea what bought this on?



I wonder that too. Even in Melb there's always channels not being used (not that I turn it on very often, usually to see why there's a traffic jam), and if the companies that use it for their business didn't, then there would be heaps!
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby cokebottle » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:39 am

It is all part of the spectrum efficiency policy, commercial users in the 400-500 MHz frequencies (taxi/couriers/security etc) are being put onto narrow band allocations as well as Police being moved onto the GRN (Government Radio Network) also a lot of new spectrum efficient technologies are being employed such as digital radio systems which are at 6.25kHz spacing so in a 25 kHz block you could fit 4 users!

Also that is why we have digital TV, more efficient & the government then sells the old TV frequencies to big business!

I am a licensed Amateur Radio operator & we are aware of threats to our "real estate" of many bands we have access to, it was thought that we would lose 430-450 MHz in this latest shake up, but instead they expanded UHF CB... go figure, there is already many business users on the in between channels on the UHF CB band.

My advice? same as mentioned above, get a Amateur Radio licence! that we won't lose any bands, as the saying goes "if you don't use it, you lose it!" getting your licence is easy, the Foundation or entry level is easy ;)

Link to Wireless Institute: http://www.wia.org.au/

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby stevo. » Thu Jul 01, 2010 7:27 am

ay CB, and anyone else that's interested in radio stuff....

here's an awesome site...

Australian Geographical RadioFrequency Map - RFMap

The Australian Geographical Radio Frequency Map (RF Map) is a site that overlays all registered RF transmitters on top of Google Maps. It is still under development, but works as a proof-of-concept. Currently generic antenna sites are shown with the red RF icon, while mobile base stations are represented by the carrier that operates from the site (often multiple carriers do, but currently the first is chosen when determining the icon). A mouse-over will give you the site's description, and a click will tell you who broadcasts from there, and at what frequencies.


The information page: http://spench.net/drupal/software/rfmap

The Goolge Map Page: http://krump.spench.net/RFMap/
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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby cokebottle » Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:41 am

stevo wrote:ay CB, and anyone else that's interested in radio stuff....

here's an awesome site...

Australian Geographical RadioFrequency Map - RFMap

The Australian Geographical Radio Frequency Map (RF Map) is a site that overlays all registered RF transmitters on top of Google Maps. It is still under development, but works as a proof-of-concept. Currently generic antenna sites are shown with the red RF icon, while mobile base stations are represented by the carrier that operates from the site (often multiple carriers do, but currently the first is chosen when determining the icon). A mouse-over will give you the site's description, and a click will tell you who broadcasts from there, and at what frequencies.


The information page: http://spench.net/drupal/software/rfmap

The Goolge Map Page: http://krump.spench.net/RFMap/


Thanks Steve, that's gold!

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Re: UHF CB BAND CHANGE

Postby stevo. » Thu Jul 01, 2010 11:19 am

yeah, i have used it to find out what antennas are around the country areas where i visit, and you can check the radiation pattern from the antennas aswell! very cool.

I just wish i could get net reception out there so i could check that site, or it might be good if they could make it so you can have it on your laptop and use it offline, because it probably doesn't need to be up to date constantly.
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